Works



Political World Map / scale: 1/2007
photograph-2007

*Printed as an edition of 1000 postcards in collaboration with BAS and CCS BARD for the exhibition “I’m not There” at CCS BARD, NY




Run

Run-2010
photograph, 40x60cm

"Could it be that emotions performed with the force of a habit are ways of effacing ourselves from the unsettling field of affects?
Yasemin Özcan’s video, Run, approaches this question from a different angle. As we watch the artist herself run next to the empty tribunes of Atatürk Olympic Stadium, what at first appears to be a competitive race against a smoothly dressed woman leaves its place to a performance of running “together-apart.” As she runs, moving through a series of uncanny obstacles—a female hand (the mother?) extending to offer a sugar cube, a flower pot of geranium, finishing line, and a cup—references to the practice of psychoanalytical therapy are implied.
One can read, for instance, the overcoming of obstacles in terms of a certain release from familial investments, or, more broadly, as a disidentification from approved answers. Similarly, the dream-like presence of the obstacles, of the disappearance and re-appearance of the woman (a therapist?), and of the empty stadium all make allusions to the fact that change, according to analysis, concerns the transformation of one’s investments and not an adaptation to the desire of the other, be it, concrete people, such as the mother, the therapist, or the symbolic authority as embodied by the grandeur scale of the stadium. Moreover, the physical effort the artist exerts in running connotes that such transformation comes not only as a result of linguistic articulation of one’s history but also involves a simultaneous corporeal experience of affects.
If one, however, slightly steps away from the metaphor of therapy, the act of running itself offers a model to contemplate an alternative way of relating to the world. The runners in Özcan’s video are present to one another even though they seem to carry distinct identifications, have different internal temporalities, and are not in constant physical and emotional togetherness. What instead connects them is an enjoyment of a means without an end. Maybe we can also think of running in parallel to art and the distance it creates within the artist, allowing the expansion of her singularity towards unknown receptions?"*

* From Ceren Özselçuk’s published text on the It's In My Nature! exhibition





Hope or Light Stress, 2016
archival pigment print
90x60cm





To Remember Everything is a Form of Madness 1/40*, 2016
Hand-painted ceramic tiles, 45x20 cm

* This expression is borrowed from Brian Field's play Translations, which was referenced by Adam Phillips, On Flirtation, 1997, Ayrıntı Publishing House, p49.





To Remember Everything is a Form of Madness 3/40*, 2016
installation, terracotta plates with various dimensions

photo credit: Ali Taptık

* This expression is borrowed from Brian Field's play Translations, which was referenced by Adam Phillips, On Flirtation, 1997, Ayrıntı Publishing House, p49.





Lions and Gazelles, 2016
installation
hand-painted woven wool carpets, lion: 200x130cm, gazelle: 145x100cm

photo credit: CHROMA - André Carvalho & Tuba Karatop

"In  Lions and Gazelles, an installation featuring painted woven wool carpets with a fir base, the viewer is left to wonder whether she is the hunter or the prey and reflect on the nature of innocence and guilt."

Artist creates `Dead-End of Bliss' for Karaköy gallery by Kaya Genç, Daily Sabah.
https://www.dailysabah.com/arts-culture/2016/10/01/artist-creates-dead-end-of-bliss-for-karakoy-gallery





While Exiting The World, 2017 
collective public sculpture at Avanos Park

photo credit: Serkan Taycan

 with English Subtitles 16:32"-17:40"  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6jjUNAegp4





The Heart of the Flâneuse, 2017
lecture-performance, 30’

"For the exhibition Flâneuses, Yasemin Özcan produced the artist's book titled Marmalade Skies featuring short stories that invite the viewer to think about the presence of women in public space via different histories, geographies, and characters. At the artist's lecture-performance titled The Heart of the Flâneuse, which draws strength from this book, with a wink to the memory of Istiklal Street and Marais, we hear the heartbeats of flâneuses who continue to sway under marmalade skies."

from the catalog of the exhibition Flâneuses





Marmalade Skies, 2017
Artist book, edition: 1500

"For the exhibition Flâneuses, Yasemin Özcan produced the artist's book titled Marmalade Skies featuring short stories that invite the viewer to think about the presence of women in public space via different histories, geographies, and characters."

from the catalog of the exhibition Flâneuses